How Far Can You Go?

How Far Can You Go?

Why do some animals migrate so far, and some stay so close to home? This activity will help you think about why different kinds of animals travel different distances when they migrate. For this activity you will need a few people: one to call out animal names, and the others to be migrating animals.
Download a Printer-Friendly PDF
River Watching

River Watching

From Rivers and Streams!

Observing things closely is an important part of being a scientist. In this activity, you’ll watch a river to see what you can notice about it.

View
Be a Wetland Detective

Be a Wetland Detective

From Marshes and Swamps!

Is there some kind of wetland near your home? Do you live near a river or lake? Or next to the ocean? Ask an adult to help you identify a local wetland to explore.

View
Ocean Journal

Ocean Journal

From Oceans and Seas!

Captain James Cook (1728–1779) was a famous British explorer. On his journey to the Arctic Ocean, he kept a journal and recorded his observations about Arctic ice. Today, scientists use Captain Cook’s notes to understand how sea ice in the Arctic is changing. You, too, can record your observations in a science journal. Who will read about your discoveries in the future?

View
Lake-Top Living

Lake-Top Living

From Lakes and Ponds!

What happens when a lake grows and shrinks according to the season? How do people live and work on a lake that’s always moving its shores? Residents on Tonlé Sap in Cambodia solved this problem by building a floating village. Imagine you are building a brand new floating village. What do you think would be good building materials? Use the scientific method to think about different ways to make a cardboard structure float.

View

Reviews

A Parents' Choice 2007 Recommended Award Winner
“This entertaining, ecology-conscious book (printed on 50% post-consumer recycled paper) has enough facts and fun inside to keep budding scientists from getting cabin fever through an entire winter season”

Kids VT
“Get ready to lean about the season! Mix real science with real fun.”

Bookbuds
“Explore Winter! and Explore Spring! are chock-a-block with facts and info-boxes on animal habitats, migration patterns, nesting habits, foraging, etc. Most [projects] looked simple, using stuff already cluttering your kitchen or family room, and could be done by a supervised five-year old or independent seven-to-nine year old. Take your kids hiking through the woods and look for signs of chewed acorns or nibbled branches. Deer! How cool.”

School Librarian's Workshop
“For those not living in such cold climates, Maxine Anderson offers Gr. 1-4 an opportunity to Explore Winter! Interspersed within each chapter is at least one silly riddle ‘Just of Laughs' and assorted quick facts.”

Detailed Book Description

Young readers become scientists in the field when Explore Winter! sends them off to answer the question "Why do we have winter?" with experiments and projects that mix real science with real fun. Combining hands-on learning with trivia, jokes, riddles, and terrific illustrations, chapters start with the "tools" of science-the scientific method and how to keep a science journal-and then investigate the winter constellations, long nights and long shadows, animal tracking in snow, and food-gathering behavior in birds.

Available In:
Paperback, $12.95
9780978503758
Includes: Table of Contents | Glossary | Resources | Index
Specs: 8 x 10 size | black and white interior | 96 pages
Subject: Science
Content Focus: Life Science
- Show Keywords -

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction
Why Do We Have Winter, Anyway?

Chapter 1
Where Did the Day Go?

Chapter 2
Coping with the Cold

Chapter 3
Adapting to the Winter Environment

Chapter 4
Water and Ice—How Nice!

Chapter 5
All About Snow

Chapter 6
Winter Weather

Glossary
Resources
Index