Skateboard Ramp Design

Your town is looking to design a skateboard park and they have asked for suggestions. You and a group of your friends have some ideas for ramps and would like to submit them to the committee.


Click here to download a print-friendly PDF

Make Your Own Plastic

While this recipe doesn’t involve boiling lilies or eggs, combining the following ingredients over heat will result in a natural plastic that you can shape, dry, carve, and paint, very similar to Leonardo’s plastic glass.


Click here to download a print-friendly PDF

Egg Bungee Drop

Zip your egg in a clear pouch and see if it can survive a wild ride. if it can’t, use trial-and-error to make adjustments—and try, try again!


Click here to download a print-friendly PDF

Simple Energy Car

With this simple car, you’ll see the difference between stored energy and kinetic energy. When the rubber band is twisted tight, it’s packed with potential energy—stored up and ready for anything. When you release the rubber band, the potential energy is converted into kinetic energy—and your car moves. Try different sizes of rubber bands to see the difference in output.


Click here to download a print-friendly PDF

Aeolipile

In this project, you can recreate the work of the Greek mathematician Hero, using water instead of steam. The basic principle of action and reaction is the same—for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. As the water shoots out of the holes in the carton, it pushes on the carton with an equal force.


Click here to download a print-friendly PDF

The Right Footing

A pagoda’s tiers hold up to the force of powerful winds by moving independently. Shibam’s mud skyrises also stand up to the force of wind. But Shibam is vulnerable to floods. Experiment with natural materials to build foundations, determining which best stand up to the forces of wind and water.


Click here to download a print-friendly PDF

Model Lungs

Lungs aren’t muscles that move themselves. Instead, they depend on air pressure in your chest cavity and movement from your diaphragm and chest muscles to inflate and deflate. Here’s how you can see this in action.


Click here to download a print-friendly PDF

Electroscope

William Gilbert used a device called a versorium to test an object’s charge. You can make a similar device to see static electricity at work.


Click here to download a print-friendly PDF

Anemometer

An anemometer measures wind speed. The Wright brothers used a handheld anemometer to estimate wind speed when they tested their flying machines. You can make an anemometer to record wind speed near your home.


Click here to download a print-friendly PDF

On the Straight and Level

In the introduction you made a plumb bob that used gravity to make sure things are vertical. Now you can make a water level, a tool that uses gravity to make sure things are straight across! The water level works because when water is in a confined space, gravity makes sure the top of it is level.


Click here to download a print-friendly PDF

Make Your Own Jumping Jack

A jumping jack is a puppet that is usually made from wood with strings connecting the joints. It is one of the earliest types of mechanical toys to use levers. The arms and legs of the puppet move up and down when the string is pulled. Try this activity to make your own jumping jack.


Click here to download a print-friendly PDF

Tetrahedron Forcebuster

Civil engineers rely on triangles for many constructions. it is the strongest shape. The tetrahedron is a shape with four triangular faces (think of the pyramids of egypt). Test how well triangle power can resist pushing and pulling forces. Ask an adult to help you thread the sewing needle and supervise as you use it. Connect the straws tightly. They should be rigid, not loose. it is helpful if. . . MORE


Click here to download a print-friendly PDF

Sending Signals

Neurons send signals by releasing chemical neurotransmitters across a synapse, the space between neurons. The axon terminal releases the neurotransmitter, which moves across the synapse and attaches to receptors on the dendrites of a nearby neuron. This generates an electrical signal that goes to the neuron’s cell body. If enough input signals are received, the cell body produces an. . . MORE


Click here to download a print-friendly PDF

Marshmallow Tower

Try the Marshmallow Challenge, a fun and quick design challenge that thousands of people have attempted.


Click here to download a print-friendly PDF

Converting Units

Chemistry uses many types of measurements. Some of the most common include distance, mass, time, temperature, volume, density, pressure, amount, concentration, energy, velocity, molarity, viscosity, and electric charge. Each of these can be measured in different ways. For example, mass can be measured in pounds, ounces, grams, and kilograms. Because of these differences, chemists must know how. . . MORE


Click here to download a print-friendly PDF

Building Bridges

Forces act on everything, even things that are standing still. Engineers need to understand forces when they build structures such as bridges. Let’s see how different bridges support the forces that are placed upon them.


Click here to download a print-friendly PDF

How Light Travels Experiment

Scientists know that light travels very quickly. In this experiment, you will discover if light really does travel in a straight line.


Click here to download a print-friendly PDF

A-maze-ing Tunnels

The underground city of Derinkuyu was made of a series of tunnels and caves, which could fit about 20,000 people! The city had stables, cellars, storage rooms, and chapels, just like an aboveground city. You can make your own tunnel city.


Click here to download a print-friendly PDF