Recycled Paper

This is a two-part activity, and this first part is messy. After you create your own recycled paper, go outside to Investigate Your Home Turf. Go outside and ramble around your home, school, a park, or a natural area. Drink in the sights and sounds of your environment. Does the scenery include mountains, ravines, prairies, or ponds? What are the weather conditions? What kinds of plant and. . . MORE


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Underwater Viewer

A lot of life cycles happen under water, where you can’t see them. With this underwater viewer you’ll be able to get a peek at the action. Have an adult with you when you use this viewer near any body of water.


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Make Your Own Freshwater

The water cycle takes salt water from the ocean and turns it into freshwater. When the salt water evaporates, it leaves the salt in the ocean. When the water vapor cools and turns into rain, it falls as freshwater! This is how rain fills lakes and rivers with freshwater. In this activity, you can explore how the water cycle turns salt water into fresh!


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Carnation Creation

Here is a really fun way to watch capillary action in action.


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Salt Water Experiment

Trapped in the middle of the ocean with no freshwater to drink? No problem! There is a way to make salt water good to drink.


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How Far Can You Go?

Why do some animals migrate so far, and some stay so close to home? This activity will help you think about why different kinds of animals travel different distances when they migrate. For this activity you will need a few people: one to call out animal names, and the others to be migrating animals.


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Honey Bee Journal

Keep track of all you do and learn in a special Honey Bee Journal. As you add more pages, your journal will start to look like a flower!


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Track a Viral Infection Map

Infection from a virus is called a viral infection. It can be transmitted from person to person. Do you know how many people can be infected from one person? Let’s find out!


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Take a Walk Through Time

Life began on the earth a very long time ago. Compared with when life first appeared, humans have been around for a very, very short period of time. This activity will help you think about geologic time compared to human time.


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Backyard Bioengineering

Bioengineering has been around for a long time. People look to nature to design products that fit certain needs. We can also simply observe nature and see how it works. Inspiration can strike and you might be able to think of a way to improve an existing design.


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Predator and Prey Journal

Good scientists keep track of many things. They write down the things they wonder about and the questions they ask. They record the steps they take in the scientific method. Create a special notebook to help you keep track of what you do and learn about predators and prey.


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Build a Model of the Arm

The arm is made of three main bones: the humerus, ulna, and radius. These bones support the arm and provide attachment points for the muscles that move the arm. Joints at the shoulder and elbow give the arm a wide range of motion and flexibility. In this project, you will build a model of an arm and recreate its movement.


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Reflection

If you have been around a lot of clean ice and snow during the day, you know it can be hard to see because it is so bright. Ice acts as a reflector. When the sun’s rays hit clean ice, most of them bounce back up into space. This makes it harder for the sun to warm things up.


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Kitchen Paleontologist

When paleontologists discover fossil bones, they are usually scattered over an area. Sometimes the bones of more than one creature are mixed together. Perhaps the bones can be put together, but a piece is missing. This activity will give you an idea of what paleontologists do.


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Darwin's Finches

In 1835, Charles Darwin visited the Galapagos Islands, in the Pacific Ocean. While there, he noticed several different types of finches. These birds were very different from the finches Darwin had seen in England. The finches on the different islands had beaks of various sizes and shapes. A finch’s beak structure determines what it can eat most efficiently. A finch with a tiny beak cannot. . . MORE


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