The Vietnam War

The Vietnam War

More than 58,000 American troops and personnel died in the humid jungles and muddy rivers of Vietnam during the 20-year conflict. But why? What were they fighting for? And how could the world’s most powerful military be defeated by a small, poverty-stricken country?

In The Vietnam War, kids ages 12 to 15 explore the global conditions and history that gave rise to the Vietnam War, the reasons why the United States became increasingly embroiled in the conflict, and the varied causes of its shocking defeat. The Vietnam War also pays close attention to the development of a massive antiwar movement and counterculture that divided the country into “hawks” and “doves.” As middle schoolers learn about how the fear of the spread of communism spurred the United States to enter a war that was erupting on the other side of the world, they find themselves immersed in the mood and mindset of the Vietnam Era.

Try these hands-on projects and investigations!

  • Create antiwar and pro-war demonstration slogans
  • Write letters from the perspective of a U.S soldier and a south Vietnamese citizen
  • Build arguments for and against the media’s coverage of the war

Price (suggested retail)

  • Softcover, $17.95
  • Hardcover, $22.95
  • eBook, $12.99

Grade Level 7–9

Ages 12–15

Subjects

  • World History

Author
 

Illustrator
Sam Carbaugh 

Specs

  • 8 x 10
  • 4-color interior
  • 128 pages

Includes

  • Table of Contents
  • Timeline
  • Maps
  • Glossary
  • Resources
  • Index

ISBN 13

  • Softcover, 9781619306608
  • Hardcover, 9781619306585

awards info

More than 58,000 American troops and personnel died in the humid jungles and muddy rivers of Vietnam during the 20-year conflict. But why? What were they fighting for? And how could the world’s most powerful military be defeated by a small, poverty-stricken country?

In The Vietnam War, kids ages 12 to 15 explore the global conditions and history that gave rise to the Vietnam War, the reasons why the United States became increasingly embroiled in the conflict, and the varied causes of its shocking defeat. The Vietnam War also pays close attention to the development of a massive antiwar movement and counterculture that divided the country into “hawks” and “doves.” As middle schoolers learn about how the fear of the spread of communism spurred the United States to enter a war that was erupting on the other side of the world, they find themselves immersed in the mood and mindset of the Vietnam Era.

Try these hands-on projects and investigations!

  • Create antiwar and pro-war demonstration slogans
  • Write letters from the perspective of a U.S soldier and a south Vietnamese citizen
  • Build arguments for and against the media’s coverage of the war

Reviews

Praise for other books in the series

Human Migration
National Science Teachers Association Recommends
I highly recommend this well–written book. It covers topics in all of the sciences, from anthropology, to environmental science to biology as well as history and geography. This would be an excellent resource book for the middle school teacher.

Publishers Weekly
The story of human migration is an old tale, far older than the written world,” explains Cummings in this exploration of the global movements of people throughout history, part of the Inquire and Investigate series. Alongside playful comic strip entries from Casteel, Cummings looks at migratory patterns that include early Homo sapiens leaving Africa, scientific debate over how humans traveled from Asia to Australia, and the colonization of the New World. Throughout, Cummings notes how archaeological finds shed light on people’s patterns of movement and highlights the motivations behind migration, whether forced or voluntary. Sidebars, reader-directed questions, and activity ideas offer additional ways for readers to consider how recent instances of migration from countries like Syria compare to those from centuries past. A timely and useful resource

The Holocaust
Booklist
This informative history of the persecution of the Jewish population during WWII begins by covering anti- Semitism from its beginnings through the Holocaust. It recounts Hitler’s rise to power, his founding of the Nazi party, and the increasing prejudices shown during that period toward Jews and others, such as the Romani people. It explains how these prejudices led to the Final Solution, the systematic mass murder of the Jews in concentration camps. Each chapter includes short facts, activities, key questions, and a “Vocab Lab” for readers, which refers them to the glossary. A helpful time line, informational sidebars, photos, maps, and comic strips all serve to reinforce the text. PS icons found throughout the text, inside a magnifying glass, link to primary sources or QR codes (some of which are prisoners’ artwork from concentration camps). Readers will gain an understanding of why they must ensure that genocide on any scale never happens again. This is a good overview of the topic for middle-grade history classrooms.



Author-Illustrator

Barbara Diggs

Barbara Diggs is a non-fiction writer who has written a range of historical articles for children. Her work has been featured in Learning Through History Magazine, History Magazine, and Renaissance, among others. A graduate of Stanford Law School, Barbara practiced law in New York for several years before becoming a professional writer. She and her family currently split their time between Paris, France, and Washington DC.


Nomad Press Titles Written by Barbara

More Details

Grade Level: 7–9
Ages: 12–15
Subjects: World History,
Specs: 8 x 10 , 4-color interior , 128 pages,
Includes: Table of Contents, Timeline, Maps, Glossary, Resources, Index,

Reviews

Praise for other books in the series

Human Migration
National Science Teachers Association Recommends
I highly recommend this well–written book. It covers topics in all of the sciences, from anthropology, to environmental science to biology as well as history and geography. This would be an excellent resource book for the middle school teacher.

Publishers Weekly
The story of human migration is an old tale, far older than the written world,” explains Cummings in this exploration of the global movements of people throughout history, part of the Inquire and Investigate series. Alongside playful comic strip entries from Casteel, Cummings looks at migratory patterns that include early Homo sapiens leaving Africa, scientific debate over how humans traveled from Asia to Australia, and the colonization of the New World. Throughout, Cummings notes how archaeological finds shed light on people’s patterns of movement and highlights the motivations behind migration, whether forced or voluntary. Sidebars, reader-directed questions, and activity ideas offer additional ways for readers to consider how recent instances of migration from countries like Syria compare to those from centuries past. A timely and useful resource

The Holocaust
Booklist
This informative history of the persecution of the Jewish population during WWII begins by covering anti- Semitism from its beginnings through the Holocaust. It recounts Hitler’s rise to power, his founding of the Nazi party, and the increasing prejudices shown during that period toward Jews and others, such as the Romani people. It explains how these prejudices led to the Final Solution, the systematic mass murder of the Jews in concentration camps. Each chapter includes short facts, activities, key questions, and a “Vocab Lab” for readers, which refers them to the glossary. A helpful time line, informational sidebars, photos, maps, and comic strips all serve to reinforce the text. PS icons found throughout the text, inside a magnifying glass, link to primary sources or QR codes (some of which are prisoners’ artwork from concentration camps). Readers will gain an understanding of why they must ensure that genocide on any scale never happens again. This is a good overview of the topic for middle-grade history classrooms.


Projects


Author-Illustrator

Barbara Diggs

Barbara Diggs is a non-fiction writer who has written a range of historical articles for children. Her work has been featured in Learning Through History Magazine, History Magazine, and Renaissance, among others. A graduate of Stanford Law School, Barbara practiced law in New York for several years before becoming a professional writer. She and her family currently split their time between Paris, France, and Washington DC.

Nomad Press Titles Written by Barbara