Human Migration: Investigate the Global Journey of Humankind

Human Migration: Investigate the Global Journey of Humankind

Human Migration: Investigate the Global Journey of Humankind retraces the paths of our ancestors, from our common roots in Africa to the complexity of today’s immigration practices, and invites readers ages 12 to 15 to explore questions about political conflict, environmental challenges, and the future of human migration.

  • Readers engage in problem solving in many different disciplines, including math, archaeology, anthropology, engineering, and genetics.
  • This text is interdisciplinary in nature and provides links to the art, culture, economics, technology, and history connected with the time periods.

Price (suggested retail)

  • Softcover, $17.95
  • Hardcover, $22.95
  • eBook, $12.95

Grade Level 7–9

Ages 12–15

GRL Z

Subjects

  • Geography
  • World History

Author
 

Illustrator
Tom Casteel 

Specs

  • 8 x 10
  • 4-color interior
  • 128 pages

Includes

  • Table of Contents
  • Timeline
  • Charts
  • Maps
  • Glossary
  • Resources
  • Index

ISBN 13

  • Softcover, 9781619303751
  • Hardcover, 9781619303713

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Human Migration: Investigate the Global Journey of Humankind retraces the paths of our ancestors, from our common roots in Africa to the complexity of today’s immigration practices, and invites readers ages 12 to 15 to explore questions about political conflict, environmental challenges, and the future of human migration.

  • Readers engage in problem solving in many different disciplines, including math, archaeology, anthropology, engineering, and genetics.
  • This text is interdisciplinary in nature and provides links to the art, culture, economics, technology, and history connected with the time periods.

Reviews

Publishers Weekly
“The story of human migration is an old tale, far older than the written world,” explains Cummings in this exploration of the global movements of people throughout history, part of the Inquire and Investigate series. Alongside playful comic strip entries from Casteel, Cummings looks at migratory patterns that include early Homo sapiens leaving Africa, scientific debate over how humans traveled from Asia to Australia, and the colonization of the New World. Throughout, Cummings notes how archaeological finds shed light on people’s patterns of movement and highlights the motivations behind migration, whether forced or voluntary. Sidebars, reader-directed questions, and activity ideas offer additional ways for readers to consider how recent instances of migration from countries like Syria compare to those from centuries past. A timely and useful resource.”

School Library Connection
At first glance, the contents of the book present themselves on an elementary level; however, the topics covered and some of the features offered might make more sense to older students. Three of the special features of the book are primary source extensions that encourage students to use their smartphones or tablets to explore resources further, vocabulary labs that help the students learn new words related to the topic, and Inquire & Investigate labs that are hands-on activities students may do to really dig deeper. All of the words in the vocabulary labs are defined in a glossary in the back of the book. The book starts with a timeline, and ensuing chapters follow in chronological order. Index. Recommended”

National Science Teachers Association Recommends
“Human Migration: Investigate the Global Journey of Humankind by Judy Dodge Cummings is a fascinating book to read for the reader of any age! Geared towards readers of ages 12–15, the book retraces the steps taken by our ancient ancestors starting in Africa. . . I highly recommend this well–written book. It covers topics in all of the sciences, from anthropology, to environmental science to biology as well as history and geography. This would be an excellent resource book for the middle school teacher.” Read the entire review online.

Booklist Online
“How did our ancestors migrate from one place to another and what motivated them to do so thousands of years ago? Why do people continue to migrate across the globe today? This entry in the Inquiry and Investigation series attempts to answer these complex questions. Cummings explores the reasons for human migration, including political conflict, racial and ethnic discrimination, and environmental disasters, while touching on today’s immigration issues and the future of human migration. Readers will discover that emerging evidence continually disproves previously accepted theories of how mankind migrated. Each chapter includes activities and key questions for readers to solve, and a “Vocab Lab” of words encourages them to refer to the extensive glossary. The time table at the beginning of text is helpful, as is the book’s most fun feature, QR codes that link videos to the text. This is a good overview of the topic for middle-grade social studies classrooms.”

Dr. Miguel G. Vilar, Science Manager, The Genographic Project, National Geographic Society
“. . . a thoroughly researched and well-written book. It covers numerous exciting and up-to-date topics in anthropology, biology, geography, environmental science, and history in an entertaining and educational framework. The subject of human migration works well in bringing these disciplines together.”

James E. Lassiter, Ph.D., Director and Ethnographer, Migration Anthropology Consultants
“This book is a valuable introduction to the study of humankind and human migration. It is an excellent primer for preparing high school students for life in society and for those who anticipate enrolling in introductory university courses in history, the natural and social sciences, and all other disciplines, for that matter.”

Praise for other books by Judy Dodge Cummings:

The American Revolution: Experience the Battle for Independence

School Library Journal
“Featuring a lively page design, this volume asks readers a series of questions to prompt them to consider the American Revolution. . . Along with the standard textual information, pages are filled with sidebars, vocabulary words, and definitions, and QR codes that provide access to primary sources. VERDICT A useful resource; purchase as needed.”

Jamie Kallio, author and youth services librarian, Chicago, Illinois
“A fresh look at a defining moment in American history. With its bright and colorful pages, active language, and interesting sidebars, The American Revolution asks pertinent questions and suggests hands-on activities to encourage young readers. Provides a full picture of the experience of American independence as our new country found its way.”

Jodi Baker, elementary teacher, adjunct professor, and educational consultant
“This interactive book will captivate the imaginations of young readers. Hearing both sides of the story encourages students to think for themselves and reflect upon the historical causes and effects of the American Revolution.”

Claire Rudolf Murphy, author
“As a writer of nonfiction for young readers, I know how important it is to make history engaging and entertaining. Cummings’ book pulls it off on all fronts. The primary source material is exceptional, featuring the stories of not only colonial leaders, but also the often ignored people behind the scenes—the women, children, black slaves, and Native Americans who also played a part. Cummings’ clear explanations of events make this book a valuable addition to the study of the colonial period.”


Look Inside

look inside book
look inside book spread

Projects

project image

Talking Trash

The trash people throw out reveals a lot about human behavior. Prehistoric garbage dumps, called middens, are gold mines of information for archaeologists. Trash can reveal when people from a culture lived, what technology the people used, what the environment was like, and how the people obtained their food. In this activity you will examine a bag of garbage to see what your trash has to say about your community.

Click here to download a print-friendly PDF


Author-Illustrator

author image

Tom Casteel

Tom Casteel is an illustrator and cartoonist with a master’s degree from the Center for Cartoon Studies. Tom has illustrated several books for Nomad Press, including Natural Disasters: Investigate Earth’s Most Destructive Forces with 25 Projects. He is working on his first graphic novel.



More Details

Grade Level: 7–9
Ages: 12–15
GRL: Z
Subjects: Geography, World History,
Specs: 8 x 10 , 4-color interior , 128 pages,
Includes: Table of Contents, Timeline, Charts, Maps, Glossary, Resources, Index,

Reviews

Publishers Weekly
“The story of human migration is an old tale, far older than the written world,” explains Cummings in this exploration of the global movements of people throughout history, part of the Inquire and Investigate series. Alongside playful comic strip entries from Casteel, Cummings looks at migratory patterns that include early Homo sapiens leaving Africa, scientific debate over how humans traveled from Asia to Australia, and the colonization of the New World. Throughout, Cummings notes how archaeological finds shed light on people’s patterns of movement and highlights the motivations behind migration, whether forced or voluntary. Sidebars, reader-directed questions, and activity ideas offer additional ways for readers to consider how recent instances of migration from countries like Syria compare to those from centuries past. A timely and useful resource.”

School Library Connection
At first glance, the contents of the book present themselves on an elementary level; however, the topics covered and some of the features offered might make more sense to older students. Three of the special features of the book are primary source extensions that encourage students to use their smartphones or tablets to explore resources further, vocabulary labs that help the students learn new words related to the topic, and Inquire & Investigate labs that are hands-on activities students may do to really dig deeper. All of the words in the vocabulary labs are defined in a glossary in the back of the book. The book starts with a timeline, and ensuing chapters follow in chronological order. Index. Recommended”

National Science Teachers Association Recommends
“Human Migration: Investigate the Global Journey of Humankind by Judy Dodge Cummings is a fascinating book to read for the reader of any age! Geared towards readers of ages 12–15, the book retraces the steps taken by our ancient ancestors starting in Africa. . . I highly recommend this well–written book. It covers topics in all of the sciences, from anthropology, to environmental science to biology as well as history and geography. This would be an excellent resource book for the middle school teacher.” Read the entire review online.

Booklist Online
“How did our ancestors migrate from one place to another and what motivated them to do so thousands of years ago? Why do people continue to migrate across the globe today? This entry in the Inquiry and Investigation series attempts to answer these complex questions. Cummings explores the reasons for human migration, including political conflict, racial and ethnic discrimination, and environmental disasters, while touching on today’s immigration issues and the future of human migration. Readers will discover that emerging evidence continually disproves previously accepted theories of how mankind migrated. Each chapter includes activities and key questions for readers to solve, and a “Vocab Lab” of words encourages them to refer to the extensive glossary. The time table at the beginning of text is helpful, as is the book’s most fun feature, QR codes that link videos to the text. This is a good overview of the topic for middle-grade social studies classrooms.”

Dr. Miguel G. Vilar, Science Manager, The Genographic Project, National Geographic Society
“. . . a thoroughly researched and well-written book. It covers numerous exciting and up-to-date topics in anthropology, biology, geography, environmental science, and history in an entertaining and educational framework. The subject of human migration works well in bringing these disciplines together.”

James E. Lassiter, Ph.D., Director and Ethnographer, Migration Anthropology Consultants
“This book is a valuable introduction to the study of humankind and human migration. It is an excellent primer for preparing high school students for life in society and for those who anticipate enrolling in introductory university courses in history, the natural and social sciences, and all other disciplines, for that matter.”

Praise for other books by Judy Dodge Cummings:

The American Revolution: Experience the Battle for Independence

School Library Journal
“Featuring a lively page design, this volume asks readers a series of questions to prompt them to consider the American Revolution. . . Along with the standard textual information, pages are filled with sidebars, vocabulary words, and definitions, and QR codes that provide access to primary sources. VERDICT A useful resource; purchase as needed.”

Jamie Kallio, author and youth services librarian, Chicago, Illinois
“A fresh look at a defining moment in American history. With its bright and colorful pages, active language, and interesting sidebars, The American Revolution asks pertinent questions and suggests hands-on activities to encourage young readers. Provides a full picture of the experience of American independence as our new country found its way.”

Jodi Baker, elementary teacher, adjunct professor, and educational consultant
“This interactive book will captivate the imaginations of young readers. Hearing both sides of the story encourages students to think for themselves and reflect upon the historical causes and effects of the American Revolution.”

Claire Rudolf Murphy, author
“As a writer of nonfiction for young readers, I know how important it is to make history engaging and entertaining. Cummings’ book pulls it off on all fronts. The primary source material is exceptional, featuring the stories of not only colonial leaders, but also the often ignored people behind the scenes—the women, children, black slaves, and Native Americans who also played a part. Cummings’ clear explanations of events make this book a valuable addition to the study of the colonial period.”


Projects

project image

Talking Trash

The trash people throw out reveals a lot about human behavior. Prehistoric garbage dumps, called middens, are gold mines of information for archaeologists. Trash can reveal when people from a culture lived, what technology the people used, what the environment was like, and how the people obtained their food. In this activity you will examine a bag of garbage to see what your trash has to say about your community.


Click here to download a print-friendly PDF

Author-Illustrator

author image

Tom Casteel

Tom Casteel is an illustrator and cartoonist with a master’s degree from the Center for Cartoon Studies. Tom has illustrated several books for Nomad Press, including Natural Disasters: Investigate Earth’s Most Destructive Forces with 25 Projects. He is working on his first graphic novel.