Engineering: Cool Women Who Design

Engineering: Cool Women Who Design

In Engineering: Cool Women Who Design, readers ages 9 through 12 discover how the science of engineering connects to their own lives. In addition to an in-depth study of the field, kids read about three women who are working as engineers and designing the products that make up our world.

  • Introduces readers to real women who are making strides in the field of engineering, making career goals feel obtainable.
  • Encourages readers to think about the mechanisms behind the user interfaces they encounter on a daily basis.

Price (suggested retail)

  • Softcover, $9.95
  • Hardcover, $19.95
  • eBook, $6.95

Grade Level 4–6

Ages 9–12

GRL U

Subjects

  • Engineering & Technology
  • Physics
  • STEM - STEAM

Author
 

Illustrator
Allison Bruce 

Specs

  • 5 3/4 x 9
  • 4-color interior
  • 112 pages

Includes

  • Table of Contents
  • Timeline
  • Glossary
  • Resources
  • Index

ISBN 13

  • Softcover, 9781619303454
  • Hardcover, 9781619303416

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In Engineering: Cool Women Who Design, readers ages 9 through 12 discover how the science of engineering connects to their own lives. In addition to an in-depth study of the field, kids read about three women who are working as engineers and designing the products that make up our world.

  • Introduces readers to real women who are making strides in the field of engineering, making career goals feel obtainable.
  • Encourages readers to think about the mechanisms behind the user interfaces they encounter on a daily basis.

Reviews

Science Books and Films 2016 Best Books List
++: Highly Recommended
“Engineering: Cool Women Who Design presents engineering as a varied and inspiring career path for women towards children. The book features wonderful examples of different women in engineering who are solving problems by creating lighting solutions for disasters, improving surgical devices, and utilizing lasers for broader applications. The book starts with an introduction to the history of engineering. Then it has three chapters that feature a particular woman’s early life, work, and challenges in engineering. There was LGBTQ representation and senior representation among the women featured in each chapter. Every chapter also had excerpts that summarize additional women’s impacts on their respective engineering disciplines. Within the excerpts, there was representation of women with disabilities and women of color. All of the scientific and engineering work described in the book was accurate and succinct, including household items for easy connection to the daily life of the reader. The book also features many links and resources for young women to further explore the possibilities engineering offers. Finally, this book is very well-written, organized, and researched. It has a glossary to allow readers to find primary sources. It engages readers by using colorful images and cartoons effectively. This is a wonderful book to introduce girls to engineering!”

Puget Sound Council for the Review of Children’s Media
Recommended — Superior in style, liveliness, integrity and format.
“Designing medical equipment, solar lighting, and optical devices using lasers are the primary areas of work for three successful women engineers, Amy Kardok, Anna Stork, and Elise Garmire, PhD. After a brief history of engineering, biographies of these three describe their childhood, obstacles they faced in their pursuit of their careers, and major contributions addressing human needs through engineering. What distinguishes this series from other biographies is the inclusion of mini-biographies of other women engineers, QR codes to access online content, such as a 3-D doodle pen, catapult design, TED talks, and surgical robots. Beginning with a “How to use this book” page, readers are directed to high quality Essential Questions in “Ask & Answer” boxes, “She Says” quote boxes, “Cool Career” suggestions, and Primary Source symbols linked to the QR codes. Back material includes a listing of all the Ask & Answer questions, timeline, glossary, additional books, websites, and places to visit, a listing of all the URL’s for the QR codes, and an index. An appealing graphic design and well-written text is only missing a few photographs of the women featured. Still a recommended purchase.”

Ithaca Child
Engineering is as old as human societies. In ancient times, engineers designed the aqueducts, the pyramids, and trebuchets. As people developed new materials. – iron, steel, plastics – engineers used them to build the things people needed: bridges, heart valves, cell phones. Engineering schools sprouted during the industrial age, but women weren’t admitted as students.

This books highlights three women who are engineers. One designs medical devices, one designs solar lighting products and one designs devices that use lasers. In addition to their stories, there are plenty of short bios about other women in engineering, such as Nora Stanton who, in 1905 was the first woman to graduate from Cornell University with an engineering degree. You’ll also find information about cool careers, and a few hands-on engineering challenges.”

Praise for other books in similar series:

Rocketry: Investigate the Science and Technology of Rockets and Ballistics

Booklist

“With clear explanations of the Newtonian and other physical principles involved, Mooney provides a history of rocketry, from steam-driven contraptions in ancient Greece to today’s (OK, tomorrow’s) SpaceShipTwo and NASA’s next-generation SLS. The seven chapters are supplemented by instructions for making 25 low-tech models and launchers useful for demonstrating how rockets work and behave in flight. . . both the hands-on portions and the relatively extensive background information will give would-be rocketeers a strong liftoff.”

Cities: Discover How They Work with 25

Projects Winner of a 2014 Silver Moonbeam Award

“School Library Journal “According to the 2010 Census, 80 percent of Americans live in urban areas. But do they know what it takes to make a city run? From this well-organized and engaging text, readers will learn how cities developed and grew. . . this is a worthy title for any library collection.”

Booklist

“Propounding the emerging interdisciplinary paradigm of STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and design, and mathematics), this hands-on informational book discusses how cities’ complex structures and systems function together in an interdependent way. Through appealing illustrations, reader-friendly text, and fun hands-on experiments suitable for home and classroom, Reilly helps foster an appreciation for the way that cities function almost as organisms with vibrant systems and interdependent structures.”

Skyscrapers: Investigate Feats of Engineering with 25 Projects

National Science Teachers Association Recommends

“. . . Skyscrapers would make an excellent resource for the history or science teacher desiring to try a project based learning (PBL) unit. With its timeline, glossary, and interesting prose, the teacher could challenge students with the question, ‘Would a skyscraper make a good school?’ In fact, this book would make a good springboard for a number of short engineering units. Skyscrapers is a terrific book, especially for elementary teachers looking for ideas to inject more engineering into their classroom.”

School Library Journal

“Large font and an open layout make this title accessible to reluctant readers . . . A useful title to supplement lessons on architecture, mathematics, or physics for classroom teachers or homeschoolers, and it’s an appealing initiation to the subject.”

Kristine E. Barnes, PE, Structural Engineer

“Skyscrapers is a fantastic introduction to the world of civil/structural engineering and the history of some really big projects and tall buildings. The projects help reinforce ideas and give kids a wonderful hands-on learning experience.” Kenton D. Wesby, Art Specialist & STEAM Educator, SECME Master Teacher “This book is awesome. Skyscrapers effectively navigates the basic principles of STEM, at the same time making connections with language arts, social studies, and visual arts. A must have for any teachers’ professional library.” Bridges and Tunnels: Investigate Feats of Engineering with 25 Projects Winner of a 2012 Gold Moonbeam Award National Science Teachers Association Recommends “This book is a treasure trove of information, experiments, and building challenges, and is an excellent, exciting, and easy way to incorporate STEM education into your classroom, science fair, or after school engineering club.”


Look Inside

look inside book
look inside book spread

Author-Illustrator

author image

Vicki V. May

Vicki V. May holds a BS in engineering from the University of Minnesota and MS and PhD degrees in engineering from Stanford University. She is a professor at the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College and is also involved in various outreach projects that bring the challenge of engineering to middle and high school students. Vicki was named Teacher of the Year for Dartmouth and Thayer in 2012 and Professor of the Year for the State of New Hampshire in 2013.


author image

Allison Bruce

Allison grew up with a love of both science and art, studying chemistry at the University of California, Davis, and design, illustration, and animation at the Academy of Art University, San Francisco. She enjoys combining traditional, hand-drawn art with digital techniques, “the merger of both methods gives me the freedom to experiment digitally, while maintaining the warmth, emotion, and life of traditional drawing.” Allison is a member of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI) as well as the Association of Medical Illustrators (AMI).



More Details

Grade Level: 4–6
Ages: 9–12
GRL: U
Subjects: Engineering & Technology, Physics, STEM - STEAM,
Specs: 5 3/4 x 9 , 4-color interior , 112 pages,
Includes: Table of Contents, Timeline, Glossary, Resources, Index,

Reviews

Science Books and Films 2016 Best Books List
++: Highly Recommended
“Engineering: Cool Women Who Design presents engineering as a varied and inspiring career path for women towards children. The book features wonderful examples of different women in engineering who are solving problems by creating lighting solutions for disasters, improving surgical devices, and utilizing lasers for broader applications. The book starts with an introduction to the history of engineering. Then it has three chapters that feature a particular woman’s early life, work, and challenges in engineering. There was LGBTQ representation and senior representation among the women featured in each chapter. Every chapter also had excerpts that summarize additional women’s impacts on their respective engineering disciplines. Within the excerpts, there was representation of women with disabilities and women of color. All of the scientific and engineering work described in the book was accurate and succinct, including household items for easy connection to the daily life of the reader. The book also features many links and resources for young women to further explore the possibilities engineering offers. Finally, this book is very well-written, organized, and researched. It has a glossary to allow readers to find primary sources. It engages readers by using colorful images and cartoons effectively. This is a wonderful book to introduce girls to engineering!”

Puget Sound Council for the Review of Children’s Media
Recommended — Superior in style, liveliness, integrity and format.
“Designing medical equipment, solar lighting, and optical devices using lasers are the primary areas of work for three successful women engineers, Amy Kardok, Anna Stork, and Elise Garmire, PhD. After a brief history of engineering, biographies of these three describe their childhood, obstacles they faced in their pursuit of their careers, and major contributions addressing human needs through engineering. What distinguishes this series from other biographies is the inclusion of mini-biographies of other women engineers, QR codes to access online content, such as a 3-D doodle pen, catapult design, TED talks, and surgical robots. Beginning with a “How to use this book” page, readers are directed to high quality Essential Questions in “Ask & Answer” boxes, “She Says” quote boxes, “Cool Career” suggestions, and Primary Source symbols linked to the QR codes. Back material includes a listing of all the Ask & Answer questions, timeline, glossary, additional books, websites, and places to visit, a listing of all the URL’s for the QR codes, and an index. An appealing graphic design and well-written text is only missing a few photographs of the women featured. Still a recommended purchase.”

Ithaca Child
Engineering is as old as human societies. In ancient times, engineers designed the aqueducts, the pyramids, and trebuchets. As people developed new materials. – iron, steel, plastics – engineers used them to build the things people needed: bridges, heart valves, cell phones. Engineering schools sprouted during the industrial age, but women weren’t admitted as students.

This books highlights three women who are engineers. One designs medical devices, one designs solar lighting products and one designs devices that use lasers. In addition to their stories, there are plenty of short bios about other women in engineering, such as Nora Stanton who, in 1905 was the first woman to graduate from Cornell University with an engineering degree. You’ll also find information about cool careers, and a few hands-on engineering challenges.”

Praise for other books in similar series:

Rocketry: Investigate the Science and Technology of Rockets and Ballistics

Booklist

“With clear explanations of the Newtonian and other physical principles involved, Mooney provides a history of rocketry, from steam-driven contraptions in ancient Greece to today’s (OK, tomorrow’s) SpaceShipTwo and NASA’s next-generation SLS. The seven chapters are supplemented by instructions for making 25 low-tech models and launchers useful for demonstrating how rockets work and behave in flight. . . both the hands-on portions and the relatively extensive background information will give would-be rocketeers a strong liftoff.”

Cities: Discover How They Work with 25

Projects Winner of a 2014 Silver Moonbeam Award

“School Library Journal “According to the 2010 Census, 80 percent of Americans live in urban areas. But do they know what it takes to make a city run? From this well-organized and engaging text, readers will learn how cities developed and grew. . . this is a worthy title for any library collection.”

Booklist

“Propounding the emerging interdisciplinary paradigm of STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and design, and mathematics), this hands-on informational book discusses how cities’ complex structures and systems function together in an interdependent way. Through appealing illustrations, reader-friendly text, and fun hands-on experiments suitable for home and classroom, Reilly helps foster an appreciation for the way that cities function almost as organisms with vibrant systems and interdependent structures.”

Skyscrapers: Investigate Feats of Engineering with 25 Projects

National Science Teachers Association Recommends

“. . . Skyscrapers would make an excellent resource for the history or science teacher desiring to try a project based learning (PBL) unit. With its timeline, glossary, and interesting prose, the teacher could challenge students with the question, ‘Would a skyscraper make a good school?’ In fact, this book would make a good springboard for a number of short engineering units. Skyscrapers is a terrific book, especially for elementary teachers looking for ideas to inject more engineering into their classroom.”

School Library Journal

“Large font and an open layout make this title accessible to reluctant readers . . . A useful title to supplement lessons on architecture, mathematics, or physics for classroom teachers or homeschoolers, and it’s an appealing initiation to the subject.”

Kristine E. Barnes, PE, Structural Engineer

“Skyscrapers is a fantastic introduction to the world of civil/structural engineering and the history of some really big projects and tall buildings. The projects help reinforce ideas and give kids a wonderful hands-on learning experience.” Kenton D. Wesby, Art Specialist & STEAM Educator, SECME Master Teacher “This book is awesome. Skyscrapers effectively navigates the basic principles of STEM, at the same time making connections with language arts, social studies, and visual arts. A must have for any teachers’ professional library.” Bridges and Tunnels: Investigate Feats of Engineering with 25 Projects Winner of a 2012 Gold Moonbeam Award National Science Teachers Association Recommends “This book is a treasure trove of information, experiments, and building challenges, and is an excellent, exciting, and easy way to incorporate STEM education into your classroom, science fair, or after school engineering club.”


Projects


Author-Illustrator

author image

Vicki V. May

Vicki V. May holds a BS in engineering from the University of Minnesota and MS and PhD degrees in engineering from Stanford University. She is a professor at the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College and is also involved in various outreach projects that bring the challenge of engineering to middle and high school students. Vicki was named Teacher of the Year for Dartmouth and Thayer in 2012 and Professor of the Year for the State of New Hampshire in 2013.

author image

Allison Bruce

Allison grew up with a love of both science and art, studying chemistry at the University of California, Davis, and design, illustration, and animation at the Academy of Art University, San Francisco. She enjoys combining traditional, hand-drawn art with digital techniques, “the merger of both methods gives me the freedom to experiment digitally, while maintaining the warmth, emotion, and life of traditional drawing.” Allison is a member of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI) as well as the Association of Medical Illustrators (AMI).