Ballistics: From Rocks to Rockets with Science Activities for Kids

Ballistics: From Rocks to Rockets with Science Activities for Kids

What are the forces behind ballistics? Why do rocks and rockets soar through the air in an arch?

 

The game is on the line. You crouch, you shoot—will the ball go in the basket?

 

You might think that nailing a three-pointer is just luck, but there are many forces at work that determine if you’ve made a game-winning shot. In Ballistics: From Rocks to Rockets with Science Activities for Kids, kids ages 9 to 12 learn why projectiles follow the paths they do. Readers who are fascinated with potato cannons, slingshots, and rocketry will love taking that next step and applying what they learn about the laws of physics to the science of figuring out where to aim. In this book, readers learn about the forces that act on the projectiles and how to calculate those forces to make educated predictions about where their homemade rockets and other projectiles will land.

 

Essential questions that promote critical examination of the science, primary sources, online videos, and science-minded engineering activities let readers have a blast learning about the physics of ballistics!

 

Try these hands-on science and engineering projects!

 

  • Perform Galileo’s famous test for gravity
  • Create clinometers to measure height and distance
  • Build a machine that can throw curve balls

Price (suggested retail)

  • Softcover, $17.95
  • Hardcover, $22.95
  • eBook, $19.99

Grade Level 4–6

Ages 9–12

Subjects

  • Engineering & Technology

Author
 

Illustrator
Tom Casteel 

Specs

  • 8 x 10
  • 128 pages

Includes

  • Table of Contents
  • Timeline
  • Maps
  • Glossary
  • Resources
  • Index

ISBN 13

  • Softcover, 9781619306783
  • Hardcover, 9781619306769

awards info
buy now

What are the forces behind ballistics? Why do rocks and rockets soar through the air in an arch?

 

The game is on the line. You crouch, you shoot—will the ball go in the basket?

 

You might think that nailing a three-pointer is just luck, but there are many forces at work that determine if you’ve made a game-winning shot. In Ballistics: From Rocks to Rockets with Science Activities for Kids, kids ages 9 to 12 learn why projectiles follow the paths they do. Readers who are fascinated with potato cannons, slingshots, and rocketry will love taking that next step and applying what they learn about the laws of physics to the science of figuring out where to aim. In this book, readers learn about the forces that act on the projectiles and how to calculate those forces to make educated predictions about where their homemade rockets and other projectiles will land.

 

Essential questions that promote critical examination of the science, primary sources, online videos, and science-minded engineering activities let readers have a blast learning about the physics of ballistics!

 

Try these hands-on science and engineering projects!

 

  • Perform Galileo’s famous test for gravity
  • Create clinometers to measure height and distance
  • Build a machine that can throw curve balls

Reviews

Praise for other books in the series

 

Innovators

 

National Science Teachers Association Recommends
Innovators is a magnificent compilation of vignettes about creative and critical thinkers who have contributed to solving problems and improving existing products or processes. . . Innovators is a wonderful book. It is engaging, readable, and full of relevant information about important inventions and innovations and the context behind them. Readers will appreciate focus on equity of gender and race among the innovators throughout the book. This book does not contain glossy color photographs, but has cartoon style illustrations throughout. Innovators would be useful for teaching science or STEM classes, for background reading in classes, or can be read and used at home just because it is such an engaging book. As a fifth grade science teacher, I highly recommend getting a copy for any third to sixth grade classroom. Read the complete review online.

 

 

Learning Magazine
“What do Google and chocolate chip cookies have in common? Both were created by innovators! Learn about the people and products that have changed the world; then get your students innovating with 25 STEAM projects.”

 

 

3-D Engineering

 

Science Books and Films
++: Highly Recommended
“. . . This book is a wonderful resource for teachers and parents to use in the classroom and at home. It gets back to the basics with exciting activities that are hands-on that support the STEM program. When kids use their hands and work together to create a prototype, the outcomes are much higher when they are actively engaged in this type of learning. It gives students confidence in math while building problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. This is a book that teachers, parents, boys, and girls will enjoy as they learn about the many facets of the engineering world.”

 

School Library Connection, April 2016
“Author Vicky V. May has produced a procedural book for the 21st century. Information covers electricity, chemistry, earth science, physics, and energy. . . The text, with fast facts, sidebars, and text boxes, is kid-friendly and the topics fit the science curriculum. Its guided inquiry approach makes this a useful tool for students seeking science fair ideas, teachers selecting creative outcomes to lessons, and learners who thrive on hands-on projects. Cartoon-like illustrations supplement the “how-to” aspect of the book nicely. Glossary. Index. Recommended”



Author-Illustrator

Matthew Brenden Wood

Matthew Brenden Wood is a math and science teacher with a passion for STEAM education. He is also an avid amateur astronomer and astrophotographer. Wood holds a bachelor’s degree in astronomy from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and lives in Phoenix, Arizona.


author image

Tom Casteel

Tom Casteel is an illustrator and cartoonist with a master’s degree from the Center for Cartoon Studies. Tom has illustrated several books for Nomad Press, including Natural Disasters: Investigate Earth’s Most Destructive Forces with 25 Projects. He is working on his first graphic novel.


Nomad Press Titles Illustrated by Tom

More Details

Grade Level: 4–6
Ages: 9–12
Subjects: Engineering & Technology,
Specs: 8 x 10 , 128 pages,
Includes: Table of Contents, Timeline, Maps, Glossary, Resources, Index,

Reviews

Praise for other books in the series

 

Innovators

 

National Science Teachers Association Recommends
Innovators is a magnificent compilation of vignettes about creative and critical thinkers who have contributed to solving problems and improving existing products or processes. . . Innovators is a wonderful book. It is engaging, readable, and full of relevant information about important inventions and innovations and the context behind them. Readers will appreciate focus on equity of gender and race among the innovators throughout the book. This book does not contain glossy color photographs, but has cartoon style illustrations throughout. Innovators would be useful for teaching science or STEM classes, for background reading in classes, or can be read and used at home just because it is such an engaging book. As a fifth grade science teacher, I highly recommend getting a copy for any third to sixth grade classroom. Read the complete review online.

 

 

Learning Magazine
“What do Google and chocolate chip cookies have in common? Both were created by innovators! Learn about the people and products that have changed the world; then get your students innovating with 25 STEAM projects.”

 

 

3-D Engineering

 

Science Books and Films
++: Highly Recommended
“. . . This book is a wonderful resource for teachers and parents to use in the classroom and at home. It gets back to the basics with exciting activities that are hands-on that support the STEM program. When kids use their hands and work together to create a prototype, the outcomes are much higher when they are actively engaged in this type of learning. It gives students confidence in math while building problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. This is a book that teachers, parents, boys, and girls will enjoy as they learn about the many facets of the engineering world.”

 

School Library Connection, April 2016
“Author Vicky V. May has produced a procedural book for the 21st century. Information covers electricity, chemistry, earth science, physics, and energy. . . The text, with fast facts, sidebars, and text boxes, is kid-friendly and the topics fit the science curriculum. Its guided inquiry approach makes this a useful tool for students seeking science fair ideas, teachers selecting creative outcomes to lessons, and learners who thrive on hands-on projects. Cartoon-like illustrations supplement the “how-to” aspect of the book nicely. Glossary. Index. Recommended”


Projects


Author-Illustrator

Matthew Brenden Wood

Matthew Brenden Wood is a math and science teacher with a passion for STEAM education. He is also an avid amateur astronomer and astrophotographer. Wood holds a bachelor’s degree in astronomy from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and lives in Phoenix, Arizona.

author image

Tom Casteel

Tom Casteel is an illustrator and cartoonist with a master’s degree from the Center for Cartoon Studies. Tom has illustrated several books for Nomad Press, including Natural Disasters: Investigate Earth’s Most Destructive Forces with 25 Projects. He is working on his first graphic novel.

Nomad Press Titles Illustrated by Tom